“Big Surveillance: What the NSA Is Doing, Why It Matters, and How to Address It”

Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Max L. Rowe Auditorium, College of Law Building
12:00 PM–1:00 PM

Join us for the David C. Baum Memorial Lecture on Civil Liberties and Civil Rights, featuring Professor Daniel J. Solove, the John Marshall Harlan Research Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School.

Lecture is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided to lecture attendees. One (1) hour of Illinois MCLE general credit.

 

Big Surveillance: What the NSA Is Doing, Why It Matters, and How to Address It”

The NSA’s massive surveillance about U.S. citizens raises profound privacy concerns. How can the NSA engage in such surveillance consistent with the Fourth Amendment? Does such surveillance pose a problem? Is it justified in light of the need to protect against terrorism? In this talk, Professor Daniel J. Solove will discuss why NSA surveillance poses severe privacy problems and why existing Fourth Amendment law has failed to address the issue.

Bio

Daniel J. Solove is the John Marshall Harlan Research Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School, a senior policy advisor at Hogan Lovells, and the founder of TeachPrivacy, a company that provides privacy and data security training programs to businesses, schools, healthcare institutions, and other organizations. Professor Solove is co-reporter of the American Law Institute's Restatement of Information Privacy Principles. 

An internationally known expert in privacy law, Solove has been interviewed and quoted by the media in several hundred articles and broadcasts, including the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Chicago Tribune, the Associated Press, ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, and NPR. Solove has testified before Congress, has contributed to amicus briefs before the U.S. Supreme Court, and has served as a consultant or expert witness in a number of high-profile privacy cases involving Fortune 500 companies and celebrities. He has written seven books and more than 50 law review articles. He blogs at LinkedIn as one of its “thought leaders,” and he has more than 750,000 followers. He also blogs at Concurring Opinions and at the Huffington Post